Now What? 4 Things to Do When Your Roommate Moves Out

Ted and Marshall. Monica and Rachel. Vinnie and the boys. Even the best of friends don’t stay roommates forever. Hopefully your living arrangements end as amicably as they did on these sitcoms, but that’s not always the case. Regardless of the circumstances, there are a handful of things you should do when your roommate moves out.

  1. Settle any outstanding debts.

Using Splitwise or another financial app makes it easy to settle expenses with roommates, even if one is moving out early. Be sure to consider security deposits, furniture purchases (foosball table, perhaps?) and other expenses that you and your roommate may have gone halvsies on.

  1. Talk to your apartment manager.

If both of your names are on the lease, you need to speak with your landlord or apartment manager right away. It’s usually as simple as filling out a form to remove one party from the lease, but the manager is not legally obligated to let you do so. If both of your incomes were used to qualify for the lease, for instance, and the manager doesn’t think one of you can afford it alone, you could be denied. Usually, landlords are willing to work with you though.

  1. Consider your own wants and needs.

Roommates add a lot to apartment living. If you enjoy sharing your space with someone else, start the search for a new roommate immediately. But if you think you might enjoy living alone for a while and can afford to do so, take some time to evaluate your current digs. Could you use the second bedroom as an office, a music studio or a guest bedroom? Or would you rather move to a one bedroom apartment? Only you can decide.

  1. Help your roomie pack.

Packing and moving is a big job. If you’re parting ways as friends, your roommate will appreciate the help. If things are a little less than friendly, it’s still a good idea to be present during packing to make sure that none of your favorite things accidentally make their way into a box.

Do you have any advice to add? Share it with other members of our community by commenting below.

Amy Johnson

is UDR’s budding social media guru, and has been instrumental in constructing the brand’s content strategy. After graduating from University of Colorado- Boulder, she started working for UDR as a marketing intern. When she isn’t perusing the web for the perfect pins and Facebook posts, she can be found hiking somewhere with her dog Rory.

1 Comment

  • September 4, 2017

    Crescat

    Excellent article about moving out, lot of people get vanish from friend map, when they move out just because not obeying these simple rules specially this paying debts rule. Thank you for the pointing out another side of the moving out scene. Keep the good posts coming cheers.